Spider-Man: Far from Home review Peter Parkers teenage kicks

Marvels cinematic domination enters a new era with this winning, witty offering This sequel to 2017s Spider-Man: Homecoming offers a soft launchpad for the next phase of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, tying up loose ends in the wake of Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

Ma review Octavia Spencer kills it in creepy exploitation thriller

The Oscar winner devours her role as a lonely woman preying on a group of teenagers in a patchy yet mostly entertaining cross between Carrie and Misery Theres a great deal of fun to be had hanging out with Ma, a nasty yet surprisingly empathetic slab of exploitation with more than just carnage on its mind. There are shades of early 90s thrillers, of the Single White Female/Hand That Rocks the Cradle mould, as well as echoes of Misery and Carrie, a film that follows a well-beaten path yet does so proficiently, a B-movie made with mostly A-grade skill. The titular terror is a lonely veterinarians assistant, played by Octavia Spencer, a middle-aged women still haunted by a traumatic high …

Rocketman review Elton’s sparkliest spectacle yet

Taron Egerton is terrific as the singer, but the real star of this electric biopic is director Dexter Fletcher When are you going to hug me? That question echoes around Dexter Fletchers dazzling rock opera a fantastical account of the highs and lows of Elton Johns wild-ride rise, told in frenetically full-blooded musical form. Its the story of a little boy who became a big star while plaintively pleading I want lurrve, but its impossible; a shy kid (an introverted extrovert) who must learn to play-act confidence after enduring a childhood that would have struck a chord with Philip Larkin. Yet unlike the problematically rejigged chronology of Bohemian Rhapsody (which Fletcher rescued from disaster), this proudly nonlinear treat puts its …

Goodbye to Gomorrah: the end of Italy’s most notorious housing estate

Famous as the setting for the hit Italian film and TV series Gomorrah, the towers of Le Vele became synonymous with poverty and organised crime until residents took charge When I think of my life in Le Vele, my skin crawls with rage, says Omero Benfenati. He looks out from a dark, narrow passageway framed by suspended steel stairways that block the natural light and lead up to abandoned apartments. Most of the windows are bricked up, and liquid leaks from split pipes on to the sewage and refuse-strewn asphalt several storeys below. We used to play down there, says Benfenati, now a housing activist. The uncollected rubbish bags make ideal goalposts for five-a-side football. Just a few years ago, …