South Korea employers face jail for sacking harassed staff under new bullying law

Abuse by those in power is so widespread that there is a word for it gabjil New legislation has come into effect in South Korea that could see employers jailed if they unfairly dismiss employees harassed at work. Employees in South Korea have traditionally been expected to turn a blind eye to abusive behaviour by those in power a phenomenon so commonplace that there is a word for it, gabjil. A recent government survey found that two-thirds of workers had experienced harassment on the job, while 80% had witnessed it. Examples of harassment include staff being ordered to write essays for their managers children, perform sexy dances for executives or even pluck out their bosss grey hairs, said labour rights …

‘I’ve paid a huge personal cost:’ Google walkout organizer resigns over alleged retaliation

Longtime employee who helped organize global protest alleges Googles response was designed to have a chilling effect on growing workplace activism A prominent internal organizer against Googles handling of sexual harassment cases has resigned from the company, alleging she was the target of a campaign of retaliation designed to intimidate and dissuade other employees from speaking out about workplace issues. Claire Stapleton, a longtime marketing manager at Google and its subsidiary YouTube, said she decided to leave the company after 12 years when it became clear that her trajectory at the company was effectively over. I made the choice after the heads of my department branded me with a kind of scarlet letter that makes it difficult to do my …